Practical Problems Require Practical Solutions: DAY 54

Practical Problems Require Practical Solutions: DAY 54

In this blog post I will be sharing a realization I’ve had about my work that has assisted me tremendously and might be assisting for others as well, whether in relation to work or something else entirely.
So – lately I’ve been feeling very stressed about my job where I’ve felt like I’m constantly chasing after time and no matter what I do I can never catch up. This is due to the nature of my job and the fact that I’m still very new at it. So there is nothing odd about that. But I haven’t exactly set a limit for myself of how much work I’m supposed to do when I come home. So what this means is that I have given myself a constantly infinite workload. Because where I am as a teacher I still have a lot to learn and so there is always more to do, but instead of for example giving myself a specific goal or amount of time to work every day, I’ve simply accepted this unlimited and infinite. So I work full time and then as many teachers, I’ve got ten hours for planning, communicating with parents and other stuff that I have to do on ‘my own time’ but I haven’t scheduled this into my plans, so instead I’ve been doing it quite randomly.
All of this has caused me to be so stressed constantly and continuously, waking up every morning and going to sleep every night thinking about all the stuff that I have to do and all the stuff I never get to.
So I started to look at this and how I’m completely new to teaching. I mean, I’ve only been at it for less than a year. So it is actually completely unrealistic of me to expect myself to be perfect as a teacher and to know everything in advance, when I can’t possibly know something that I’ve never done before. So this is the first point that I realized. Secondly there are many things in life that are somewhat infinite and incessant in how they can always be better. And with such points it doesn’t make any sense to expect oneself to be able to get ‘behind’ them in one day or even one week or year, because it is simply not possible. So what I see is that I’ve got to start setting some realistic goals for myself but also within this, that this is a point that isn’t just about my teaching and how I expect myself to be ‘complete’ or ‘perfect’ within that, but actually how this pertains to other areas of my life as well.
I’ve seen once again how important one’s starting-point is and how we often tend to blame reality for something that we’re actually creating within our minds. Because for example – it is not necessary to be stressed. It doesn’t help anything or anyone that we’re stressed. It doesn’t change the situation. And often we simply keep being stressed instead of actually look at the context of what we’re facing as a practical problem with a practical solution.
So this is what I’ve found: points are either practical points with practical solutions OR they are mind-problems that aren’t real in fact that then require a change in our starting-point where we simply require stopping and letting the point go because it isn’t an actual problem.
Now – obviously there will be practical problems that we can’t necessarily solve practically, at least not immediately, but then a solution may involve accepting the situation for what it is and enabling oneself to make it as best as possible within the giving conditions that one cannot immediately change.
But the mind problems are actually what we most often preoccupy ourselves with and this is completely unnecessary and counter-productive because there aren’t any solutions involved.
So for me these points have been very cool to realize because through them I’ve been able to change my approach to myself within my work. So simply by changing how I look at my work, how I approach it – my entire experience has changed. Because this was a mind-problem and because I was preoccupying myself within that, I actually diverted my focus and attention from looking at the actual practical problems that I do have the ability to solve and change. So since this realization, I’ve actually been able to do something about my work situation and I will investigate and look at how I can implement this realization into other areas of my life.
I recommend reading the following blogs:

Education in the New World Order    

Education is a Human Right
Deconstructing the Root of All Evil
World’s best Education is based on Equality 
The Fall of our Education System
Application of Knowledge, is it being Fostered in ourEducational Systems? – Education Research Part 1

You are also welcome to view the videos on my YouTube channel here

Who I am is Who I’ll Teach my Kids to Be: DAY 51

Who I am is Who I’ll Teach my Kids to Be: DAY 51

As I mentioned in the previous post, I’ve been working with becoming the best teacher I can possibly be. One of the ways I’ve worked with this is through making sure that when I’m with the kids, that I am 100 % unconditionally here with them and not thinking about going home or being somewhere else. So the previous week I’ve worked with this point, both through writing, self-forgiveness and practical application. So I’ve simply focused on stopping the thoughts that come up and this has turned out to be very effective. I am much more able to simply be here and enjoy being with the kids and give them my full attention. Even when I’ve had a ’bad day’ or some bad experiences before going to work, I’ve been able to go into the classroom and be consistent and present with the work. So I have realized that this is what it means to be professional and why it is so important to be professional, to not take owns own stuff to work, but to be able to remain here, consistent and fully present. So I am quite satisfied with this side of my application. For me this is also quite an interesting point because throughout my entire life I’ve been vehemently against working and I’ve been quite scared of getting a regular ‘nine to five’ job. So I’ve found it refreshing and surprising that one can work in such a job and yet not have that experience of feeling trapped.

So the point that I’d like to continue working with, is more in relation to ’who’ I am as a teacher, in relation to being too nice, but also in relation to ‘missing the mark’ in terms of what to expect from my students. I’ve found that I either expect too much or too little. In the beginning when I started the job, I was quite ambitious and thought that I had to ‘educate’ using regular materials such as textbooks. However as I’ve continued my work, I’ve discovered that it is possible to teach in a way that isn’t boring or tedious for the students. However I also see that I’ve then gone too far off in the opposite direction of only focusing on the lessons being fun and enjoyable for the kids. So what I’ve seen is that this relates to my own relationship with doing things I judge as ‘tedious’, things that are hard and that I don’t already know how to do. So when I’m faced with students who express that they find the course material boring or when they say they don’t want to do it, I go into a state of panic. I’ve also thought that it is my job to make it fun and as such if the kids aren’t enjoying it, then it is my ‘fault’ and responsibility because I’m not professional enough as a teacher.

But what I’ve also learned in my own life – or rather, I’ve understood it but not yet entirely implemented it into and as myself as a living expression of who I am, is the point of doing things that are hard and difficult or pushing through something that’s tedious simply because it is a necessary process in order to understand a certain subject. An example could be practicing multiplication tables in math. Now here also the point of balance comes in. Because I see how it doesn’t have to be so that one just have to ‘drill’ these tables through a boring method of memorization. I am certain that there must be ways of learning these tables that are flexible and dynamic. But at the same time, that doesn’t mean that students don’t have to face the point of something requiring a lot of work and effort.

So what I’ve done is to allow them to make excuses and justifications and I’ve let them get away with it. I’ve not done this purposefully – but because of an automated pattern within myself of doing the same. And the consequence in my life has been that I haven’t learned the value of hard work nor the delay of gratification that is necessary in almost all fields of life. When I was a kid I spent my weekly allowance on candy every single time and so I was never able to save up money to buy something that I really wanted.

In a class recently with an eight grade student, we talked about cliches and cultural expressions. I shared with her some Danish expressions that she didn’t know. One of them is a traditional cliche that says: “Don’t jump the fence where it is lowest” and it refers to a moral of not taking short cuts or taking the easiest way out. But as my student say: “It doesn’t make sense. Why not jump the fence where it is lowest?” And I had to agree with her. And we talked about how such cultural cliches sometimes lose their meaning because society changes. So there is a lesson in that as well. That its not just about learning hard work for the sake of making work hard. Learning can definitely be fun and fast and enjoyable. But that doesn’t mean that we should cut corners when we are faced with something we find difficult. 

So this is a point that I’d like to work on within myself and with the kids. Because I certainly don’t want to stand as an example of cutting corners to them, teaching them to make excuses and justifications for not doing something that might not be fun in the moment. The expression ‘cutting corners’ is actually quite accurate because I tend to ‘cut’ corners when I’m walking around in the house. I always try to take the shortest path, but the result is that I often walk into the corners because I try cutting them too close resulting in bruises on my body.

In the next post I will commence with self-forgiveness on this point so that I can release myself from this point and stand up and take self-responsibility for myself within it, so that I can change myself as the example that I am to the kids I work with. Because if I don’t understand or appreciate the value of hard work, how can I expect that they will? If I accept and allow myself to make excuses and justifications for not doing something that I find tedious or difficult, how can I expect any different of them? And as such this is the task we have as teachers and adults in general. We can’t teach kids something that we’re not living ourselves and they will reflect ‘who’ we are right back in our face, which is sometimes not so enjoyable, but none the less necessary for us to see that a change is required.

 In conjunction with this blog series, I suggest to take a moment to read the following blog-post on Basic Income and Teaching where the points I’ve discussed here are further expanded upon.


I recommend reading the following blogs:

Education in the New World Order    

Education is a Human Right
Deconstructing the Root of All Evil
World’s best Education is based on Equality 
The Fall of our Education System
Application of Knowledge, is it being Fostered in ourEducational Systems? – Education Research Part 1

You are also welcome to view the videos on my YouTube channel here

Teachers, Lets Give our Students the Education We Would have Liked to Receive: DAY 49

Teachers, Lets Give our Students the Education We Would have Liked to Receive: DAY 49

In my work as a teacher I have noticed that I tend to be very ‘soft’ with the children, in the sense that I’ve focused more on getting them to like me and on them enjoying the classes than on making sure that they learn. This has had the consequence that a lot of them don’t do their work and try to ‘trick’ me into not doing ‘boring’ stuff and only doing fun stuff like playing games. Now – this is quite a complex point, because on the one hand – my professional ambition is that education should be fun and enjoyable always and that it is the quality of the teacher’s professional skills that determine whether or not this is so. What I mean is that a teacher with a high quality of professionalism ought to be able to make even the most boring topic fun and enjoyable.
However at the same time, I also understand that everybody would prefer having an easy and fun time all the time, but there are things we have to do that aren’t necessarily fun or easy – and this is something that I’ve even had trouble accepting throughout my own life. And I see how they take advantage of my ‘softness’. So I have to teach them exactly as I’m now teaching myself, the value of hard work, the value of putting your all into a project, the value of completing something and being satisfied, the value of challenging yourself. Because I don’t want them to grow up and become like me and other adults around me where you fake your way through and not in any way value education, where you can barely commit to completing an assignment because you haven’t developed any form of self-discipline. So I want to challenge them as I’m now challenging myself to learn all the things that I didn’t learn growing up. 
It is interesting to see how specific this situation is, in that it reflects directly back to myself. Because I also always tried tricking the teachers into doing something fun and I hated boring and tedious projects and I hated when there was something I weren’t good at. So I see how I have subconsciously (because I wasn’t aware of it) decided to not be the same kind of teacher that I experienced as a child. But I also realize that there were adult guidance that I would have benefitted from as someone teaching me the value of pushing through and expanding oneself as well as the satisfaction of doing work for oneself and perfecting and completing it.

So earlier today I saw a post on thumbpress titled “10 InappropriatelyFunny Test Answers! It was basically a collection of test answers from students who had mocked the test or the teacher or sometimes perhaps even written serious answers that was then considered funny because of its simplicity. This post was shared on Facebook as something funny but when I looked at it I couldn’t see anything funny about it. Because I remember exactly what it was like sitting they’re taking these tests, looking at this piece of paper. And often times, either I didn’t know the answer or I found the questions utterly trivial. And so I understand to some extent why students mock these tests, because in many instances there’s a complete disconnect between the lives of the students and what is presented to them by the teachers. It’s this theoretical world that often doesn’t have any connection to the child’s reality. However at the same time, the children often don’t understand or care about the consequences of failing a test and this can actually have tremendous effects on their future lives, at least when it is taken to the extreme of dropping out of school for example.

 So what I see is that there’s a serious problem in how we as teachers are expected to teach children about the world.

Returning to my professional ambition as a teacher I am sure that it is possible to create educational curricular that children enjoy but this requires a high level of quality on the part of the teacher and for example in my job, I do get paid for preparing lessons, but this time isn’t part of my regular work schedule, which means that I have to do this work in the evenings and on weekends. With so little time, it is not practically possible for me to do the required research and planning to create a top quality curricular for my students. And I am sure that this is something many teachers can relate to. As I’ve been writing this I have come to realize that this idea of teaching children things that aren’t fun and enjoyable is a myth. But at the same time, this doesn’t mean that there won’t be situations where the child has to push through and for example do things that they find hard. After all, they’re in school to learn.

An ideal society is a society that truly cares about teaching children real and profound values that can assist them to grow up and become citizens who contribute to a world that is best for all. And it astounds me time and time again how we as a society take education for granted as though the current way of doing things is unquestionably the best and only way to do things – while all evidence shows that we’re doing something profoundly wrong and ineffective.

So I am taking up the challenge for myself to develop a way of teaching where I am not ‘soft’ on one hand, simply letting the children slide through actually doing them a disservice and on the other hand also not simply expecting that teaching has to be boring and tedious and that children simply have to learn to submit themselves because “that’s how life is.”

We don’t have to take the educational system for granted, however we obviously have to adhere to the current rules and regulations. And what this means is that one of the most important tasks teachers have is to get involved in the politics of education and contribute to changing the education system by sharing our perspectives, by showing what it is we do, by collaborating with and supporting each other to expand our professional ambition.

If I were a child today, I would want my teacher to challenge me. I would want my teacher to guide me and support me to understand and appreciate the work that I do as a student. I would also want education to be fun and enjoyable and relevant to my life and the world around me. And so what we can do as teachers is to give to our students the kind of education that we ourselves would have liked to receive. I mean, in the end, isn’t that what education should be based on and not some stagnated belief and doctrine where what we believe children have to learn doesn’t take the actual child into consideration?

In conjunction with this blog series, I suggest to take a moment to read the following blog-post on Basic Income and Teaching where the points I’ve discussed here are further expanded upon.

I recommend reading the following blogs:

Education in the New World Order    

Education is a Human Right
Deconstructing the Root of All Evil
World’s best Education is based on Equality 
The Fall of our Education System
Application of Knowledge, is it being Fostered in ourEducational Systems? – Education Research Part 1

You are also welcome to view the videos on my YouTube channel here

Why the Most Important Jobs Gets the Least Respect: DAY 47

Why the Most Important Jobs Gets the Least Respect: DAY 47

I’ve recently started back at work as a teacher and once again it astounds me how much work is put into being a teacher compared to the status that teachers have in society. First of all, there is a common idea that being a teacher is an easy job, which is reflected by how, in many countries, it is one of the easiest educations to go through and graduate from and so there’s this belief that “If you can’t do anything else, you can always become a teacher.” And we all know the saying: “Those who can’t do, teach.”
I admit that I have most definitely been one of those people who saw teaching as an almost embarrassing job and teachers as ‘losers’ who’s got nothing better to do. Only when I became a teacher myself, did I realize how much work one has to put in to actually provide quality and relevant education for one’s students.
Furthermore, within most countries, teachers are expected to work fulltime-teaching classes while having little time to prepare for lessons. I experience this in real time where I often will use nights and weekends researching and preparing lessons. For me to be the kind of teacher that I strive to be, a teacher that actually offers something of value to my students, I have no choice but to make use of my ‘free time’ because there is simply not enough time during the normal working-hours to prepare and plan lessons.
I would therefore suggest, for anyone who still believes that being a teacher is easy, to go and teach for three months – whether it is adults or children or high-school students. And I’ve realized that it is the same with most jobs that are devalued in our society.
We look at plumbers and carpenters and street sweepers – and believe that we could easily do their jobs, that they have it easy and that little to no effort goes into their work. This is most prominently reflected in the salaries that these people earn and in the social status they have in society. They’re the people who’s job it is to make other people’s lives easier and more convenient and therefore they belong to a sort of ‘servant class’ in society – whereas those who’s job it is to work with abstract tasks of more academic and intellectual nature are considered more important and even hard-working. Because their job is to innovate and think out solutions for society, we tend to see them as more intelligent and superior.
This way of dividing society can be traced as far back as to Plato who, in his ‘State’, claimed that only philosophers/thinkers/academics were fit to rule society and make decisions on behalf of the ‘every day man’. This was to him, complete common sense and simply the natural order of things. Little did he realize that we was promoting a stratified and disjunctive society.
But who considers that a plumber, to do a good job fixing your pipes, actually has to know what he’s doing which means he has to have training and education to understand plumbing? Who considers how, a plumber who does a good job fixing your sink or your clogged toilet actually has put in effort and skills into his work?
How can we possibly claim that someone working in academics or in media is more important than say, a plumber or a teacher?
From my perspective  – and yes, I am a teacher – education is one of the single most important corner stones of our society, of the future of the world. And yet we’ve given the teaching profession little to no value.
I often times would wish that I had more time – much more time – to prepare lessons, to do research, to further educate myself. Because then I would be able to keep expanding myself as a teacher, I would become a better teacher. And I would like to be the best possible teacher I can be. Isn’t that what we would want for our children? To be taught by someone who is professionally passionate about teaching? If so – then why are we giving teachers so little value, so low wages, so poor education and so little time to prepare?
Perhaps it is because we don’t really care. Perhaps it is because we see schools and education as institutions where children are merely ‘stored’ and ‘kept in line’ to know nothing but the basics of what a person needs to know to participate in work-life as adults. Is it then so odd that teachers become demotivated and apathetic towards their profession, when no one truly expects them to excel? I strive to be the most optimal teacher I can possibly be, but this is certainly not because of any support from the people who employ me or the salary I get or the hours I have to work. It is for the sake of my own professional integrity and for the sake of the students I teach.
What is fascinating is that the professions that are devalued and that has the lowest prestige in society, are most often the ones that focuses on our physical reality, while the most prestigious jobs are those that focuses solely on mental capabilities. This then shows us something about how we prioritize in society, how we value mental abstraction, theorization and intellectualization over actual practical reality.
And surely, our reality is a real-time reflection of this. Because we keep building houses that are thought out of some conceptual imagination of grandeur rather than focusing on housing that is practical and best for all in the community. Legislators seem to have never set foot in the fields that they so casually legislate upon, often leaving those of us who work in these practical fields, with an insane amount of paperwork and very little time to do our actual job.
My original goal was to work with developing educational systems. It still is. I am more passionate about education than ever. But I am also grateful and humbled by this opportunity to be a teacher – and to meet other teachers who work with passion and integrity and a true professional respect for their students and their work. Because if I had stepped right out of university and into academia or politics or other fields focusing more on the abstract aspects of education, I could have easily made assumptions about what is best for the education system, that would be in complete contradiction with what reality looks like. How can anyone possibly make assumptions or claim qualification to make decisions on behalf of workers, whose field they’ve never tried with their own hands?
Isn’t this then also a much more global problem that has to do with how we live in general on this earth where we believe that we know what’s going on in other countries, in war zones, in religious communities, even in other people’s minds – and accordingly make decisions and even legislate based on these assumptions?
Isn’t it about time that we learn to place ourselves in the shoes of others – no matter who it is – so that we can get to a common and equal understanding of where we’re at and what is required for us to make this world into a place that we would be proud to bring children into? 
Fact: Social Stratification Causes a Disjunctive and Dysfunctional Society. If a field of work is of benefit and necessity to a society it should be valued as such in equality.
In conjunction with this blog series, I suggest to take a moment to read the following blog-post on Basic Income and Teaching where the points I’ve discussed here are further expanded upon.

I recommend reading the following blogs:
 

Automation is the Key to Effective Education 
Education in the New World Order    

Education is a Human Right
Deconstructing the Root of All Evil
World’s best Education is based on Equality 
The Fall of our Education System
Application of Knowledge, is it being Fostered in ourEducational Systems? – Education Research Part 1

You are also welcome to view the videos on my YouTube channel here

 Natural Learning Abilities blog series – a MUST READ!
The Secret About How I Hacked The Education System and What I learned: DAY 39

The Secret About How I Hacked The Education System and What I learned: DAY 39

In this post I am going to share a secret with you. I am going to share how I hacked the education system and what I learned from it. And if you are currently a parent to a child in school or to a child that will be going to school I suggest reading the following carefully. The story that I am going to share with you is about how we as parents, even when we think and believe that what our children is learning in school is effective – actually have no clue what they are learning in fact. It is also a story about the imperative of vocabulary and natural learning ability as a keystone in effective education that is virtually non-existent in our current education system. I will start by sharing how I was introduced to words as a child.
See – my example, as a child going to school is not one of academic failures or learning difficulties. From when I was a baby, my grandmother had taken it upon herself to teach me words and show me the world. So she would walk with me in a stroller from the moment I was born and she would talk and talk and talk about the world and everything she saw. I obviously don’t remember any of this, but I learned how to talk early and it was easy for me to formulate words. I have been told that the very first word I spoke was: “Oops!” This came to be so because it was a word used by my father when he dropped something and if you are wondering why my first words wasn’t ‘mom’ or ‘dad’ it is because my parents deliberately taught me to not call them ‘mom’ and ‘dad’. I called them by their first names. Fast-forward to the school age, my mother would read for me every night and if she wasn’t able to read for me, she would put on a cassette tape with a story and I would listen to this before I fell asleep. Throughout the years my mother read many books for me and it wasn’t long until I started to read books for myself. I clearly remember that the reason why I decided to learn how to read, was because it irritated me that the adults that I lived with, wouldn’t read the subtitles to the American TV-shows we were watching anymore, and then I couldn’t understand what was going on. So – I decided to learn how to read and write. So as you can see, I was fortunate. In many ways I had a supportive environment to learn and grow and develop a vocabulary that many children do not have.
Now – fast forward ten years or so. I was now and avid reader and it was my childhood dream to become a writer. I had written a journal since I was around ten years old and I thoroughly enjoyed constructing sentences and making the words flow as well as playing with the rhythm of sound for example when writing poetry. Eventually I came of age where it was time to take exams. I wasn’t a particularly self-disciplined child and I preferred taking short-cuts wherever I could and I disliked the feeling I got when I did something new and I wasn’t good at it. So slowly but surely I developed a personality where I avoided things that I wasn’t immediately good at and otherwise I just tried to sail through whatever exam I was facing with the least amount of effort.
I quickly discovered that exams weren’t really about actually learning, knowing or understanding something. I realized that exams were a particular system with particular rules where all that mattered was that I had followed the teacher’s instructions and done what they had asked of me. All I had to do was to understand the system and then play the game. Because what I realized was that it was just a game, it was all for show. It had to be because no one ever cared about what I really knew or understood in fact. No one ever asked. So I developed this as a skill and within the cockiness of my teenage ego, I deliberately played around with doing minimal work and still get top grades. And I did get top grades. And so I understood that I could ‘hack’ the system by simply understanding how the exam or test was supposed to look like for me to get top grades. This was equally so for oral exams or written tests. Sometimes I did put more effort into it because it interested me and with other subjects such as math, I didn’t put any effort in at all and I failed my classes.
When I got to high school I had developed this skill of ‘hacking exams’ to such an extent that I would smoke weed the night before or literally come to the exam stoned and still ace it – because I understood exactly what the teacher wanted to hear, how they wanted me to present myself for an oral exam or how they wanted me to construct my words. In most subjects I hadn’t read any of the books or assignments required throughout the year. I would only do the bare minimum of weekly assignments to not get in trouble, but otherwise I would just sail through the school year, actively participating in class, pretending like I knew what I was talking about and then go take the exam at the end and get top grades.
But then a peculiar thing happened: a classmate of mine had extreme anxiety towards going to exams. She was generally a very hardworking student who would read everything in the curriculum and do her assignments on time, but when it came to exams, she just froze and ended up getting grades that in no way matched her actual level of understanding. Several of my classmates also expressed resentment towards the fact that I could stride through the exams without actually having done any work, when they had worked so hard for it all year only to receive mediocre grades. Now, it wasn’t all as black and white as it might sound here. I did read the texts required for the exams, but I read them quickly and skimmed through them and some of my classmates who worked hard indeed got top grades as well. But this was the first time that it occurred to me that they system is absolutely absurdly constructed and not reflecting any real measurement of the actual understanding, comprehension or reflection upon the material taught in school.
After high school I went to get a bachelors degree in education and there the exact same scenario played itself out. I mean, I did study but not to the same degree as many of my classmates and still I walked straight through with top grades. A point I’d like to mention within this as well is that in the years where I was studying for my degree, the rules around funding for educational facilities changed so that they now got funded based on how many students graduated. This is something that was of particular concern for us studying education because we could see several of our classmates in no way being fit to work with children or teach passing their exams. How legislators can’t put two and two together and see the consequence of such a decision to based funding on how many people graduate – is absurd. And it shows, along with the whole grading system and the means to measure how much people learn that our educational systems are not being operated from a starting-point of actually educating people.
So by this point, I had started getting an interest in the education system and its many absurdities not to mention all the aspects that I could see were unacceptable and required being changed, so I decided to continue with a master’s degree in educational sociology. During the course of this education I did exactly the same as I had always done, I sailed through it. But at this point my lack of self-discipline had started to annoy me. I was also embarrassed and ashamed that I didn’t actually read the books but instead pretended that I knew what I was talking about. I had trapped myself in my own ego and cockiness towards ‘hacking’ the education system. I finally started seeing how I got absolutely nothing out of ‘cheating’ the system. Yes I got good grades, yes teachers often liked me – but I had absolutely nothing to show for it. Most of what I actually know about education, I know from my own personal experience and from speaking with people – and not from the books or the teachers. So after twenty years in the education system, on my way to a master’s degree, I realized how I had wasted my life just to beat the system and get good grades, somehow believing that the grade itself was what was valuable and useful when leaving one educational level to continue to the next. I obviously didn’t develop this belief out of the blue, because it is stressed upon children that it is important to get good grades from the moment they start in school. But is it ever stressed to actually understand the material we are reading? Or to be able to reflect on it and expand on it and see it multidimensionally in its relation to other subjects or matters? My obsession with grades wasn’t even about academic achievement or ideas about future success. For me it was all about ego and seeing what I could get away with. I taught myself to improvise and make up stuff on the spot and it worked for me and I got a thrill out of doing it, so I kept going. Until I realized how I had wasted my life.
During the time where I studies for my master’s I decided to take a course in sociology of gender. I had never really studied gender but the course looked interesting so I decided to give it a go. It turned out that the course was actually a Ph.D. course that was now offered to master’s students on a trial basis. Somewhat independent on the subject of the course, it was the best course I have ever in my life taken and I was clued to the chair with eyes wide open for every single lecture. The professor directing the course was amazing and many times guest lecturers would come to teach a particular subject. These were Ph.D. graduates who had just finished writing their dissertations and often had very specialized areas of interest. They would give us cutting-edge state of the art articles to read where they would share the latest research in their particular field. And they would talk about their projects and link the real life experiences of people directly to the theory upon which they had researched their particular subject. Nothing in this course was ‘general information’, you know the typical curriculum where you learn ‘a little about everything’ but where it feels like you haven’t actually learned everything. No, they would delve into small details and show us how these linked together with historical periods or specific discourses in society. I discovered that the reason why I enjoyed this course so much was because each and every single one of the lecturers was sincerely and genuinely passionate about what they were sharing. I many times said to myself inside: “This is what I’ve been waiting for all these years. This is real education.” And at the same time I was sad to see how I had nearly come to the end of my ‘career’ as a student before I actually experienced what education is supposed to be like. But at the same time I was grateful that I did get to experience it and experience myself within it and see how I could be passionate, attentive and disciplined and inspired by the work of these lecturers. During this course I also got some worldview perspectives that I had never heard before, it expanded my vocabulary but also my academic horizon more than twenty years of education hadn’t been able to do. So when the course was done I actually decided to change the subject of my master’s thesis completely and instead write about one of the topics that had interested me the most within this course.
But by the time I was writing my thesis I realized that I was facing years and years of automated behavior systems of cheating and taking short cuts, so it was virtually impossible for me to change my work ethics. I struggled with it for months and eventually I simply did it, I wrote a couple of pages per week and I did read a lot of books and articles that I enjoyed and learned a lot from. When I finally handed in my thesis, I was nowhere near satisfied. And in the three months where I was waiting for the result I was preparing myself for the worst-case scenario of not passing and having to rewrite my thesis. Because see, once I got to the thesis and the advancement of the knowledge and vocabulary presented to me, I realized that I couldn’t fake my way through it. I had to actually understand what I was reading and writing. So after many weeks of feeling inferior to the information, I started highlighting all the words I didn’t understand. And after I had read an article or a section, I would go and look up the word and then deliberately integrate it into my vocabulary by using it for example when I was writing. And so within the six months where I was writing my thesis, I expanded my vocabulary exponentially. I eventually received the results and I was absolutely dumbfounded when I saw that I had gotten an A. Because I compared that A to the work effort I had put into writing the thesis and I could not see the work reflected as a top-product. I felt like I didn’t deserve it. But what I realized, as I have realized continuously throughout my years of participating in the education systems, is that grades mean absolutely nothing. They do in no way reflect the actual integration of information or the work put into a project or a paper.
So parents, even if your children are receiving good grades, you don’t actually know what they are learning or if what they are learning is what is best for them. Unfortunately schools and all other educational facilities currently exist within the sole purpose of generating enough money to survive. And most of what we are being taught in school does in no way prepare us to become effective human beings or be able to reflect upon our reality, our world or ourselves. Instead we learn and we tell each other and our children that we must be prepared to face the global competition, that China is gaining in on us, that children in South Korea are better educated and all this leads all of us to exist in a constant pressure to perform and win – but not to learn and certainly not to enjoy education.
And so ironically enough I now work as a teacher. It wasn’t my first choice of jobs. I never wanted to be a teacher. But the passion I have for education, the passion I have for changing the education system is growing every day.  Because I have seen that it is possible to structure education in such a way that students actually learn and I have experienced it on my own body. And I know for a fact that the current education system has very little to do with actual education and more to do with producing people trapped in their own ego and fear of not surviving whose only purpose it is to grow up and keep the competition going.
The changes required in our education systems are straightforward and so commonsensical that I cannot even fathom that this isn’t already implemented:
The first imperative point is that teachers must be people who are passionate about education, people who have grown and developed themselves and who actually have something to share, from which students can expand their perspective on reality – no matter the subject. Seriously, who wouldn’t agree with this? And yet, if we do agree with it, how is it that we are still accepting our children to be taught within the current education system, by teachers who see teaching as an easy paycheck? Why is it that we send our children to school in a trust that they will learn, when we know exactly what it is like to sit there day after day being stuffed with information that goes in through the one ear and out through the other?
Secondly, we require a complete re-definition of what education is. Education must be sacred in a way – because it is from education that we are building the future world of tomorrow. Education must adhere to the highest standards in society of what it actually is that children learn to be and become – and not simply follow the corporate capitalist system as a petrified slave that believes it can do nothing but to follow its master. Because even within our obsolete and redundant education system, we are still creating the future world of tomorrow and what is absurd is that we’re not even realizing what kind of world it is we are creating and re-creating through this education system. I mean, how blind can we be?
Thirdly, we require different and new ways of teaching and we require new educational tools and ways of measure integration of information and vocabulary. At the moment we simply learn words randomly ad nauseam and we attach meanings and values to these words within our mind without anyone ever cross-referencing if how we understand a word is actually the best definition of the word and if the consequences of how we understand it and thus live according to it will be best for all. All we have to do in the current education system is to be able to parrot words according to the test requirements so that the teachers can get their grade and not get fired for being incompetent, so that the schools can get their grade and still receive their funding, so that our countries governments can look competitive in the eyes of other countries governments, so that we all can go on pretending that there’s order and that what we’re doing in this world makes sense. 

All we have to do is to look at the state the world is currently in – in fact – and we’ll see that none of what we are doing currently makes any sense and it certainly isn’t best for all. And it all starts with education.

Furthermore, it is imperative that we develop an understanding of how the mind works and how the physical body works and how the natural learning ability of a child is developed and can be supported and to do that we require a new foundation upon which we can make collective decisions about our education system, from research and theory to the actual educational material and tools. Therefore I recommended investigating the Living Income Guaranteed system that is a new economic proposal to restructure our economy in such a way that education will be a top-priority and that we can as citizens together make decisions that are best for all of us and more specifically for our children, instead of simply running the rat race in such a state of fear that we don’t even realize that we could have made a difference, had we just given ourselves and each other the chance.
I urge any parents to take it upon yourself to take responsibility for your children’s education. Not from a perspective of controlling them out of fear – but from a perspective of understanding that our children is our future. And whatever they are learning to prioritize, value and see the world as – which they learn directly through us as adults – is the kind of world we create for their children. Now, I’m not saying to now go and take your child out of school within a belief that you can do a better job. Unfortunately we can’t escape the current system and we are equally a part of the equation that has been severely miscalculated through the course of history. But what we can do is to re-educate ourselves. What we can do is to dedicate ourselves to the education of our children, speak to them, share with them and make a commitment to become an example that another way of learning is possible, that it is possible to be a human being with integrity, that education can be enjoyable and that the imperative of education – real education – cannot be understated or compromised. 

Research material and bibliography: 

  • Are we Aware of our Behavioural Development?–Day 339 
  • Who is Responsible for our Children’s Education – Day 332 
  • Is the Zoo an Educational Experience for Children – Day 333 
  • The Santa Claus Conspiracy – Can a Child Trust their Parents? – Day 334
  • Rejection as Parental Control? – Day 335 
  • Rejections as Parental Authority – Day 336 
  • Does the Education system Prepare the Children to Face the World – Day 337
  • Where did my Child learn to Behave like that? – Day 338 
  • What is care really? Day 340 
  • Psychological Experiments and Accountability – Day 341
  •  Finish Everything on your Plate! – Day 355
  • The Botox Epidemic – Day 362 
  • Does your child really have a behaviour disorder? (Part 1) – Day 363
  • Does your child really have a behaviour disorder? (Part 2) – Day 364 
  • Does your child really have a behaviour disorder? (Part 3) – Day 367
  • Study finds children would not think of overweight person as a potential friend – Day 369
  • Children are exposed to Porn sites from age 6 – Day 370 
  • The Fall of our Education System – Day 374 
  • The Early Catastrophe – Day 375 
  • Crying children apparently entertain us – Day 377 
  • Jamie Oliver – Nugget experiment – Day 380
  • – See more at: http://mayaprocess.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_2.html#sthash.LKvN3TUp.dpuf

    Natural Learning Abilities
    Natural Learning Abilities
    Natural Learning Abilities
    Natural Learning Abilities

    Chris Hedges (2009) Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle

    Democracy and Education in the 21st Century – Interview with Noam Chomsky:
    Noam Chomsky: Who Owns the Earth?
    Suggested documentaries to watch:


    John taylor gatto the ultimate history lesson:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQiW_l848t8&list=PL463AA90FD04EC7A2

    Propaganda:


    Third World America – Chris Hedges

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drZE65_134g

    The Power Principlehttp://metanoia-films.org/the-power-principle/

    The Trap
    http://archive.org/details/AdamCurtis_TheTrap

    Psywar
    http://metanoia-films.org/psywar/

    Human Resources: Social Engineering in the 20th Century
    http://metanoia-films.org/human-resources/

    The Century of the Self: Part 1- Happiness Machines
    http://youtu.be/prTarrgvkjo

    On Advertisement and the end of the world: 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8gM0Q58iP0

    In conjunction with this blog series, I suggest to take a moment to read the following blog-post on Basic Income and Teaching where the points I’ve discussed here are further expanded upon.

    I recommend reading the following blogs:

     

    Automation is the Key to Effective Education 
    Education in the New World Order    

    Education is a Human Right
    Deconstructing the Root of All Evil
    World’s best Education is based on Equality 
    The Fall of our Education System
    Application of Knowledge, is it being Fostered in ourEducational Systems? – Education Research Part 1

    You are also welcome to view the videos on my YouTube channel here